Auto Pedigree deal assistance used as cash back example

What is the ‘Cash Back’ Option in Vehicle Deal Assistance?

Auto Pedigree’s Deal assistance offer allows you as a car buyer to structure your own deal in terms of payment options. One of these options includes what is referred to as ‘cash back’.   The cash back option allows you as a car buyer the flexibility to use the amount in other ways. Good ways to put this option to use could go towards a student loan or school fees, settling your high interest personal loans, and generally paying off outstanding debts. This means you are not obligated to use the money towards the purchase of a vehicle. You’re also able to buy a better quality vehicle because you’ve alleviated your other expenses.   Auto Pedigree gives you the choice to use the amount in any way you want.   How does the Cash Back Option Work? Example of how the deal assistance cash back option works   On the successful purchase of a vehicle and payment from the bank, Auto Pedigree will process the cash back amount into your bank account via EFT or with a cheque. If you need cash on hand then this deal assistance option is for you. Other Deal Assistance Options There are at least three other options, and deal assistance is even flexible enough to allow you to choose any combination. Therefore, you can combine your cash back option with any of the following:   Deposit – used towards the upfront payment of the vehicle Trade-in – Add the amount to your vehicle purchase Deferred payment – Use the amount to pay for the initial instalment/s  Vehicle deal assistance provides a way to structure vehicle payments by selecting which options suits you, your lifestyle, and your pocket best. Let Auto Pedigree help you find your new used car, because you deserve a great deal.   https://www.fin24.com/Money/Vehicle-Finance/a-few-common-misconceptions-when-buying-a-car-20160329 https://www.sapling.com/4869424/what-different-types-budgeting https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://federalautoloan.com/blog/how-do-cash-back-deals-work/ https://www.carsdirect.com/auto-loans/how-to-buy-a-car-with-cash-back https://www.carsdirect.com/car-buying/understanding-car-dealer-rebates-and-incentives    
Dashboard lights
Dashboard Lights and what they Mean
What’s the first thing you see when you get into your car? The dashboard HUD (Head up display) is a critical interface that provides us with important information, such as speed, revs per minute, engine temperature, and fuel levels. Newer models also tell us the outside temperature, which gear is engaged, and even the radio station you’re tuned into. But every so often, one of these little icons light up that we don’t easily recognise. These on-dash icons are almost always linked to your vehicle’s warning light information system. There are many and they can seem confusing at times, especially when you don’t know what they mean. Don’t worry though – your car won’t suddenly stop running when a light starts flashing en-route to work. Their purpose is to warn us, rather than to cause panic and alarm.   Let us take a look at some of these more common indicators and what they mean: Engine Light: Quite possibly the most important, this light tells us that your car’s computer has run a diagnostic and found some trouble. Take your car to a service professional to have it checked. Oil Pressure Warning: This important indicator means that you’re out of oil or have lost oil pressure. Head to the nearest petrol station for an oil top-up. If it persists, check for leaks under your car, which indicates a serious problem and needs to be booked in for a repair. Engine Temperature Warning: This light means that your car is getting a little too warm. Try taking it easy on the accelerator, stop riding the clutch, check your water levels, or make sure you have enough coolant in your car. This could also mean things are chilly under the bonnet. Tip: In winter, drive off slower in the morning for a few minutes before to let the engine warm up properly.  Brake System Warning: You either still have the handbrake engaged or your brake fluid is running low. You may also have an ABS problem. Release the handbrake fully, top up your brake fluid or, if the problem still shows, head over to a service professional. Battery Warning Light: This means that the power voltage level of your car battery is not where it should be. Take a peek at the power terminal, check that it’s clean and all connections are secure and well fitted. If the light remains, visit a battery specialist to have the unit tested. There are a myriad of other warning indicators on your dash HUD, some indicating minor problems such as an empty windscreen washer fluid reservoir and others, indicating more serious issues that need to be investigated immediately. Always take action when you see these dashboard light indicators. They’re your little helpers – a way for your car to tell you that it needs a little TLC. When you buy a car from Auto Pedigree, your car sets off on the right foot with a 116-point check. From the instruments and lighting, to engine transmission and braking, your vehicle is inspected to ensure complete driving peace of mind.
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Automatic Numberplate Recognition Industry Workshop held in Johannesburg
Automatic Number Plate Recognition Industry Workshop
Fouché Burgers and Roelof Viljoen, Business Against Crime South Africa Mobility is the key to success – it is even the synonym of progress. While we can (still) not transport goods and people through the Internet, we need to move it using some sort of vehicle. In South Africa, all organisations deal with long distances and a lack of punctual, effective, safe public transport. It follows that a fully operational and capable road vehicle is an extremely valuable asset to anyone. This is true for legitimate business as well as criminal networks. Criminals will go to great lengths to make their operations blend into legitimate traffic. Vehicles are both instruments in crime (providing mobility) and targets of crime (generating income by selling stolen goods). Imagine any high-risk crime committed with a bicycle and a cash robbery with a horse and cart as a getaway vehicle. Maybe in the 1800s – Wild West cowboys attacking a train carrying gold bullion – but in 300 years, all types of business moved on. In South Africa, the value of road vehicles stolen and hijacked per year adds up to R13 billion. More than 20 000 vehicles in this group (valued at R4 billion) re-enters the market illegally as a clone of a legitimate vehicle while others (valued at R1.4 billion) are taken apart for parts. Some of these legitimised vehicles are retained to commit crime, but most of them are again sold on, eventually into the hands of consumers.   The Emergence of Number Plates Very early in the road vehicle history, authorities realised that vehicles are too similar and have to be allocated a means of identification from a distance. Number plates emerged in France in 1893, Germany in 1896 and the Netherlands in 1898. Thus, when road vehicles started becoming commonplace in Johannesburg in the first decade of 1900, number plates were an established feature. With the official population of registered motor vehicles in South Africa first surpassing 12,5 million in January 2019, it is evident that automated identification is necessary to enable the legitimate economy to fight back against the erosion of economic growth by motor vehicle-related crime. Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) is a technology embraced by law enforcement as a new enabler to address vehicle-related crime. It is claimed to have been invented in 1976 at the Police Scientific Development Branch in the United Kingdom. Several terms are used for the same technology such as Licence Plate Recognition (LPR), Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI), etc., born by the informal industry from the need for a marketable brand. Law Enforcement in the form of the Johannesburg Metro Police Department first implemented ANPR on a large scale in South Africa. In 2006 the cost of a camera and system was prohibitive. Modes of deployment included stationary cameras for speed law enforcement, vehicle mounts to increase the footprint and intelligent roadblocks. As the technology was facilitated by the rapid growth in closed-circuit television (security cameras), the barrier to entry into the market was lowered and the private sector started deploying the technology to protect its own operations against vehicle-based crime. Several business types emerged along the supply chain to identify, record and react to vehicle position information. These systems collect a wealth of information that can be used by law enforcement agencies (e.g. police) and the private sector to fight crime effectively.   Commitment to Fighting Crime On 20 February 2019, the SAPS held a workshop with government departments and agencies responsible for the enforcement of vehicle control and vehicle-related information. All these agencies committed to collaboration in the initiatives to fight vehicle-related crime and specifically the collaboration with the private sector. Most of the cameras in South Africa is owned by the private sector or community initiatives, which makes it different from other countries where the infrastructure was implemented by government. This creates a unique environment for a public-private partnership in the ANPR industry. BACSA has positioned itself to, in collaboration with Business Leadership SA, enhance its role to facilitate partnerships and collaboration with the private industry role players and Government such as the SAPS. One of the areas of focus is to clarify and support issues regarding ethics and standards in the use of technology.   Workshopping a Way Forward On 13 March 2019, Business Against Crime South Africa (BACSA) successfully facilitated the first industry workshop on Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) in Johannesburg. Forty-six (46) nominated representatives from twenty-nine (29) private and public organisations including the SAPS, system users, technical developers, service providers and industry associations participated. The aim of the workshop was to determine the way forward to ultimately make South Africa a safer place through a structured collaboration of the industry role players and to determine the feasibility of creating a cost-effective and non-commercial solution to leverage the wealth of available information.   The workshop noted that the quality control of number plates seriously affects the usefulness of ANPR technologies. It is further noted that the principles and technical detail for the envisioned information interchange shall be documented and agreed to by all parties. All the participants indicated their support for the initiative, led and facilitated by BACSA in partnership with the SAPS. Although a lot of work still needs to be done, BACSA has reviewed its memorandum of understanding with the SAPS, which includes the ANPR project and is of the opinion that this structured collaboration between businesses and government is an initiative that will assist in making a sizable difference in the fight against crime.   For more information or to take part in this initiative, please see www.bac.org.zaor send an email to info@bac.org.za.   
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Auto Pedigree deal assistance used as a deferred payment example
What is a Deferred Payment Option?
Auto Pedigree’s Deal Assistance offer allows you as a car buyer to structure your own deal in terms of payment options. The deferred payment option allows you to start paying your finance instalments at a later date. The deal assistance amount can be used to pay for your initial instalments to the finance bank upfront, anything from 1 – 8 months; the exact amount of time depends on the amount available on your specific transaction and deal structure. The Advantage of Deferred Payments Delaying your instalments to pay a few months later means you can take a ‘payment holiday’. Use your deal assistance amount towards initial monthly instalments The first few instalments are paid for and in effect not due immediately out of your pocket  Deferred payment terms can vary, make sure you understand the details and your particular situation. But there’s no doubt that being free of instalments to pay for the first few months of buying your vehicle is of great benefit to you. How does the Deferred Payment Option Work? In order to determine when your first debit order will commence, divide the deal assistance amount offered (e.g. R50,000) by the instalment amount (e.g. R7,142).   Take a Payment Holiday   Example of how the deal assistance deferred payment option works   One Lump Sum Payment  The full deal assistance amount offered can also be used as an initial lump sum payment in the first month. Other Deal Assistance Options  There are three other options, and deal assistance is even flexible enough to allow you to choose any combination. Therefore, you can combine your deferred payment option with any of the following: Deposit – used towards the upfront payment of the vehicle Trade-in – Add the amount to your vehicle purchase Cash back - Use the amount for your personal needs Vehicle deal assistance provides a way to structure vehicle payments by selecting what options suits you, your lifestyle, and your pocket best. Let Auto Pedigree help you find your new used car, because you deserve a great deal.    Sources: A loan arrangement in which the borrower is allowed to start making payments at some specified time in the future. Deferred payment arrangements are often used in retail settings where a person buys and receives an item with a commitment to begin making payments at a future date.   Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/deferred-payment.html https://www.theconsumerlawgroup.com/blog/why-you-should-avoid-a-deferred-down-payment-plan.cfm
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Auto Pedigree deal assistance used as cash back example
What is the ‘Cash Back’ Option in Vehicle Deal Assistance?
Auto Pedigree’s Deal assistance offer allows you as a car buyer to structure your own deal in terms of payment options. One of these options includes what is referred to as ‘cash back’.   The cash back option allows you as a car buyer the flexibility to use the amount in other ways. Good ways to put this option to use could go towards a student loan or school fees, settling your high interest personal loans, and generally paying off outstanding debts. This means you are not obligated to use the money towards the purchase of a vehicle. You’re also able to buy a better quality vehicle because you’ve alleviated your other expenses.   Auto Pedigree gives you the choice to use the amount in any way you want.   How does the Cash Back Option Work? Example of how the deal assistance cash back option works   On the successful purchase of a vehicle and payment from the bank, Auto Pedigree will process the cash back amount into your bank account via EFT or with a cheque. If you need cash on hand then this deal assistance option is for you. Other Deal Assistance Options There are at least three other options, and deal assistance is even flexible enough to allow you to choose any combination. Therefore, you can combine your cash back option with any of the following:   Deposit – used towards the upfront payment of the vehicle Trade-in – Add the amount to your vehicle purchase Deferred payment – Use the amount to pay for the initial instalment/s  Vehicle deal assistance provides a way to structure vehicle payments by selecting which options suits you, your lifestyle, and your pocket best. Let Auto Pedigree help you find your new used car, because you deserve a great deal.   https://www.fin24.com/Money/Vehicle-Finance/a-few-common-misconceptions-when-buying-a-car-20160329 https://www.sapling.com/4869424/what-different-types-budgeting https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://federalautoloan.com/blog/how-do-cash-back-deals-work/ https://www.carsdirect.com/auto-loans/how-to-buy-a-car-with-cash-back https://www.carsdirect.com/car-buying/understanding-car-dealer-rebates-and-incentives    
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Example of how to spot an illegal imported vehicle: This model is not sold in South Africa, and it has foreign, square number plates.
South Africa a Dumping Ground for Illegal Imported Vehicles
Original article posted on Business Against Crime website 27 March 2019 in News - Fouché Burgers, Programme Executive, Business Against Crime South Africa (BACSA)   Don’t be caught off guard. It is illegal to buy an imported used vehicle. All illegally imported vehicles are seized by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) and are destroyed (compacted) by Government.   In an article published on 26 November 2018 on by the Citizen online, it was reported that South African Revenue Service (SARS) destroyed several imported illegal vehicles valued close to R4 million as part of a clampdown on noncompliance in various customs sectors.   After a house, a car is one of the most important purchases made by most consumers. For many people a vehicle is the most expensive mobile asset that they will purchase and is therefore probably one of the biggest decisions they’ll make during their lives. As we all know this process is a very daunting experience. It is thus important to take the time to do the necessary checks before completing these transactions, which will save the buyer and in many cases the seller as well, much inconvenience and a lot of money!   Consumers in the market for a used car should be on high alert for unscrupulous sellers and buyers who are ready to pounce on their hard-earned cash and take them for a ride. It is a reality that there are thousands of cars on South African roads, which were either hijacked or stolen, along with illegally imported vehicles that are used to defraud innocent buyers.   The importation of used vehicles into South Africa is prohibited under the International Trade Administration Act (Act 71 of 2002). The importation of used vehicles is only allowed in exceptional cases, for example, to immigrants with permanent residence and residents returning to South Africa.   Illegal Vehicles Sold in SA to Unsuspecting Buyers The majority of South Africa’s neighbours rely on passage through South Africa for their imports, which include second hand vehicles. Many of these “in-transit” used vehicles do not reach their final destination, or find their way back, illegally, into South Africa as relatively cheap used vehicles and sold to the local unsuspecting public. Many South Africans are losing their vehicles along with the money invested in buying these vehicles, as these illegal imports will be confiscated by law enforcement.   During the early 2000s, South Africa implemented a number of measures to curb this problem. It is however apparent that the illegal importation of used vehicles is becoming a problem once again. Mainly motor vehicles deregistered in Japan, sold on auctions and shipped to Southern Africa were the problem back then.   How to Identify Illegal Imports These vehicles are normally easy to visually identify by, for example, models that are clearly not sold in South Africa, mirrors on the front fender of the vehicle, mirrors in the back window, labels in the side windows in foreign languages, and wipers on the front headlights. Currently, more vehicles from other parts of the world are offered in South Africa. These motor vehicles, in many cases, look like the vehicles that are sold in South Africa.   Illegal Vehicle Problem Escalating It is also becoming more apparent that Southern Africa is being used as the dumping area for stolen motor vehicles from all over the world, largely due to European countries having implemented measures to curb this problem in their own countries.   Many illegal imported and stolen vehicles are not necessarily old and unsafe vehicles. In many instances, these are expensive and luxurious vehicles, which are offered at a good price to the South African public.   The illegal importation of vehicles can only be described as a massive problem, and besides personal trauma to the local RSA buyer when their vehicles are confiscated, these vehicles are illegally by-passing RSA customs thus placing the entire new and used motor industry under pressure.   Although some of the vehicles are registered on the NaTIS (the South African National vehicle register), many vehicles are advertised and sold as vehicles registered in our neighbouring countries. Promises are also made by the unscrupulous sellers, that for an extra fee, the vehicle will be registered in South Africa.   All illegally imported vehicles are seized by the South African Revenue Service (SARS), International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) or by the South African Police Service (SAPS). These seized illegally imported vehicles are in most cases destroyed (compacted) by Government. Stolen vehicles are confiscated by the SAPS and returned to their rightful owners.   These vehicles are not allowed to stay in South Africa, even if the buyer was unaware that it is an illegal imported vehicle, or are willing to pay all duties or if the rightful owner is prepared to sell the vehicle to the owner in South Africa. The South African owner will not be able to obtain an import permit from ITAC since it is still a contravention of the International Trade Administration Act (Act 71 of 2002).   Don’t be caught off guard. Potential buyers of used motor vehicles must be vigilant when buying a vehicle. Most of the measures to prevent buying an illegal imported vehicle are the same as the measures to prevent buying a stolen cloned vehicle.   How to Safeguard Yourself from Illegal Imports The following is recommended: Never buy a vehicle advertised or displayed with foreign number plates. Never buy a vehicle that is registered in a foreign country – even our neighbouring countries. The probability of you being allowed to import the vehicle is very low. Never buy a vehicle without a NaTIS registration certificate. If the vehicle is financed, the registration certificate will be at the bank and it will only be released if the vehicle is paid in full. Check that the information on the registration certificate and/or license disc match with the information on the vehicle. Check that all the VIN/chassis numbers on the vehicle match each other and have not been tampered with. Check for spelling mistakes on the registration certificate and that it is not a photocopy. It is strongly recommended that used vehicles be bought from reputable dealers. Although this is not a guarantee, chances are better that the vehicle you’re buying from a reputable dealer is legal. It is important for reputable dealers to protect themselves, not only from losses but also to protect their reputation. These dealers normally check that the vehicles being sold are legal and have the knowledge to identify imported vehicles. It is also easier to hold them liable if it is found that the vehicle was illegally imported or stolen. It is strongly recommended that buyers of used motor vehicles should not buy a vehicle if a microdot confirmation certificate was not issued for the vehicle by a reputable accredited microdot fitment centre. All motor vehicles, locally manufactured or imported, registered for the first time in South Africa after 1 September 2012 must be microdotted. If a vehicle has not been fitted, it should be verified and fitted with microdots. The Second-Hand Goods Act, 2009 (Act No. 6 of 2009) makes it a requirement that second-hand motor vehicle dealers must record motor vehicle details, which includes the recording of the microdot particulars on the microdot. This makes the microdot information readily available to be verified.  For information on accredited microdot fitment centres near you, please contact Microdot Association of Southern Africa, DataDot Technology (www.datadot.co.za), Veridot (www.veridot.co.za) and Recoveri Tag what’s Yours (https://recoveri-tag-whats-yours.business.site/). The golden rule is, if the deal looks too good to be true, walk away, because it probably is. Use your head, not your heart. For more information on microdots, please contact the Microdot Association of Southern Africa (www.microdotassociation.co.za). For more information on article published by the Citizen, please see https://www.citizen.co.za/news/south-africa/2041508/illegally-imported-vehicles-destroyed-in-kzn/
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Beware of Buying Illegal, Cloned Vehicles
Beware of Buying Illegal Cloned Vehicles
Article courtesy of https://bac.org.za/   Don’t be caught off guard when buying a used motor vehicle. There is a good chance that the second-hand vehicle, that you are considering buying, could be a stolen, hijacked or illegal imported vehicle that re-entered the market as a cloned vehicle. If you do end up buying one of these illegal vehicles, it will result in you losing both the vehicle and the money used to purchase it when recovered by the police.   The Resale of Stolen Vehicles After a house, a car is probably the most important purchase made by most consumers. As this process is a very daunting experience, it is important to take the time to do the necessary checks before completing these transactions. This will save the buyer, and in many cases the seller as well, much inconvenience and a lot of money!   Consumers in the market for a used car should be on high alert for unscrupulous sellers and buyers who are ready to pounce on their hard-earned cash and take them for a ride. It is a reality that thousands of cars on South African roads have either been hijacked or stolen or are illegally imported vehicles. It is these vehicles that are used to defraud innocent buyers.   More than 1.5 million stolen and hijacked motor vehicles have never been recovered. They have either been exported, chopped for parts or have reached the end of their lives without being recovered. Many, however, have been cloned and are in South Africa, being used on our public roads by mostly unaware, innocent owners.   It is estimated that more than 20,000 unrecovered motor vehicles, valued at more than R4 billion, are illegally entering the South African motor vehicle market annually and are filtered back into the hands of consumers, mostly as cloned vehicles.   SA is Dumping Grounds for Stolen Vehicles   Furthermore, it is also becoming more apparent that Southern Africa is being used as the dumping area for illegal imported and imported stolen motor vehicles from all over the world. The illegally imported and stolen vehicles are not necessarily old and unsafe vehicles, in fact in many instances, these are expensive and luxurious vehicles which are offered at a good price to the South African public.   All illegally imported vehicles are seized by the South African Revenue Service (SARS), International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) or by the South African Police Service (SAPS) when they are identified. These seized illegally imported vehicles are mostly destroyed (compacted) by Government. Stolen vehicles are confiscated by the SAPS and returned to their rightful owners.   Throughout the lifespan of these illegal vehicles, motor dealers will buy and sell them; banks will finance them; insurance companies will insure them; and the public will unknowingly buy them. There is a good chance that the second-hand vehicle, that a consumer is considering buying, could be a stolen, hijacked or illegal imported vehicle that re-entered the market as a cloned vehicle.   If you do end up buying one of these illegal vehicles, this will result in you losing both the vehicle and the money used to purchase it when recovered by the police.   Vehicle Theft Prevention with Microdotting   To prevent the cloning of motor vehicles and the use of parts from stolen motor vehicles, microdotting of motor vehicles was recommended and the implementation supported by BACSA as early as 2003.   Microdots are disc-shaped particles, typically 1mm or less in diameter, containing a unique identification number. In the case of motor vehicles, thousands (minimum of 10 000 for most vehicle types) of these microdots are sprayed on a number of overt and covert places. It is proven that it is close to impossible for criminals to remove all the microdots. The microdots effectively provides the vehicle with its own DNA. There is a once off cost to fit microdots and no monthly payments.   The fitment of microdots to new vehicles and vehicles presented for police clearance became compulsory from 1 September 2012. Every fitment is recorded on the National Traffic Information System (NaTIS). By the end of January 2019, NaTIS statistics showed that 5.06 million vehicles registered in South Africa had microdots fitted. This represents more than 40% of the total live motor vehicle population of South Africa at the time and 100% of all vehicles manufactured and / or imported after 1 September 2012.   The use of microdots to identify vehicles has become a standard practice within the SAPS and forms an integral part of vehicle identification and the investigation process. Microdots are central to the process of identifying cloned vehicles. It is however rarely used by motor vehicle dealers and other businesses to identify possible cloned vehicles.   It is incomprehensible that microdots are not used by everyone as a standard to mark assets and later identify possible stolen motor vehicles and other valuable items.   BACSA, with the help of the accredited members of the Microdot Association of Southern Africa, DataDot Technology, Veridot and Recoveri Tag what’s Yours, are currently training more than 2 000 SAPS Designated Second-Hand Goods Officers to enforce the legal requirements of the Second-Hand Goods Act, 2009. More than 16 000 SAPS members, mostly detectives, have already been trained to use the technology.   Recommendations When Buying a Used Motor Vehicle   * Never buy a vehicle without a NaTIS registration certificate. If the vehicle is financed, the registration certificate will be held by the bank and it will only be released if the vehicle is paid in full. * Check that the information on the registration certificate and/or license disc match the information on the vehicle in all aspects. Check that all the VIN/chassis numbers on the vehicle match each other and the certificates and that it has not been tampered with. * Check for spelling mistakes on the registration certificate and that it is not a photo copy. * Never buy a vehicle advertised or displayed with foreign number plates. * Never buy a vehicle that is registered in a foreign country – even our neighbouring countries. The probability of you being allowed to import the vehicle, is very low. It is also illegal to ordinarily operate a foreign registered vehicle in South Africa. * Illegally imported vehicles can visually be identified by, for example, models that are clearly not sold in South Africa, mirrors on the front fender of the vehicle, mirrors in the back window, labels in the side windows in foreign languages and wipers on the front headlights. * It is strongly recommended that used vehicles be bought from reputable dealers. Although this is not a guarantee, chances are better that the vehicle you are buying from a reputable dealer is legal. It is important for dealers to protect themselves, not only from losses but to a greater extent from a tarnished reputation. These dealers normally check that the vehicles being sold are legal and have the knowledge to identify imported vehicles. It is also easier to hold them liable if it is found that the vehicle was illegally imported or stolen. * In the same vein, it is strongly recommended that used motor vehicle dealers, auctioneers of used vehicles and even salvage dealers, do not purchase any motor vehicles that was registered in South Africa after 1 September 2012 without first verifying the microdots physically on the vehicle. The Second-Hand Goods Act, 2009 (Act No. 6 of 2009) makes it a requirement that second-hand motor vehicle dealers must record motor vehicle details in the prescribed register, including the microdot number read from the microdot on the vehicle. This makes the microdot information readily available to be verified. * It is strongly recommended that buyers of used motor vehicles should insist; from the dealer / seller; on a microdot fitment confirmation certificate issued for the vehicle by a reputable accredited microdot fitment centre. For information on accredited microdot fitment centres near you, please contact Microdot Association of Southern Africa, DataDot Technology (www.datadot.co.za), Veridot (www.veridot.co.za) and Recoveri Tag what’s Yours (https://recoveri-tag-whats-yours.business.site/). * It is recommended that financial institutions (banks) do not finance and that insurance companies do not insure vehicles of which the microdot fitment and its originality has not been verified. * The golden rule is, if the deal looks too good to be true, walk away, because it probably is. Use your head, not your heart. For more information on microdots, please contact the Microdot Association of Southern Africa. Fouché Burgers, Programme Executive, Business Against Crime South Africa (BACSA) Original post appeared on 22nd March at https://bac.org.za/two-cloned-vehicles-using-the-same-natis-record-of-a-3rd-legal-vehicle/    
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Deal assistance option
How to use deal assistance deposit option
In terms of the National Credit Act, there is no minimum cash deposit required on a vehicle purchased, whether new or used. However it is advisable to include a deposit towards the selling price of the vehicle. This can be in the form of a trade-in, should you want to replace an existing car, or in the form of cash.   This is one of the options in Auto Pedigree’s R50,000* vehicle Deal Assistance. The Deposit option can be used as a cash amount towards the price of the ‘new’ second hand vehicle you intend to purchase.   Advantages of a Vehicle Deposit   By making a deposit towards purchasing a vehicle using Deal Assistance:   1. You need not use your savings towards a deposit 2. The amount the bank will be financing will be lower 3. Therefore your monthly repayment amount will be lower 4. And you will pay less interest over the term of your loan   How much deposit you need depends on the length of the finance period, but a general guideline is that older vehicles should have a higher deposit with a shorter repayment term. Most of Auto Pedigree’s used cars on sale are late model vehicles that are no more than two years old.   Vehicle Buying Tips   When it comes to deciding on what to do with your Deal Assistance, much depends  on your unique individual situation and needs. However, there are two simple tips to consider that may help make a decision:   1. Opt for a shorter repayment period. 2. Pay more upfront.   When you buy a used car from Auto Pedigree, you get quality, value, and choice from a wide variety of vehicles at 75 dealers countrywide. Take advantage of our deal assistance promotion. Contact your nearest branch today.   *Up to R50,000 on selected vehicles   Disclaimer:   Auto Pedigree and the authors make no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or by following any link on this site. Auto Pedigree and the authors will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. Auto Pedigree and the authors will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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Family holiday
Tips for a December family holiday
Tips for a December Family Holiday                December is a time to regroup and recollect, to take a look at the past year and seeing how far we’ve come and grown. Have we achieved what we set out to do - and are we all the better for it. We’ve worked hard and played hard, and when all is said and done, now is a time for family and loved ones.   The Elements of a Holiday   Holidays are not so much only about where you go, but also about how you get there, and whom you go with. There are a number of aspects that can make or break a great family holiday. As you begin your holiday planning consider some of these tips:   Family and Friends   Yes, it goes without saying that any holiday needs some level of planning. And everyone has their own checklist to tick off, such as making sure the car is serviced, the pet minder is booked, the house alarm is in working order - not to mention that important list of what-to-pack items. But there’s another list we don’t always think of.   Since this is a time for family and loved ones, why not round up your favourite friends and family members for a year-end bash. Go beyond your comfort zone and invite those cousins, aunts, and uncles you love but haven’t seen at all this year. How about that friend who’ll be spending December alone this year? Not only is it a good opportunity to reconnect and bond, but to share each other’s energy and positivity as the year closes. The list can contain two or twenty-two people. It all depends on your appetite,need, and desire. Remember, the rule is not to feel obliged, the rule is to be genuine.   The Journey   A good set of wheels to get you from home to holiday and back is another important element. Family-friendly vehicles are made for these road trips. The cabins are more spacious, the boot space is more generous, and they have the extra little comfort features for long journeys that make the ride a more enjoyable experience.   If you’re interested in saving up for a family car in the future, this list might interest you. These cars were the best value-for-money family cars in the pre-owned category as selected by Gumtree.   Cross-over between R200 000 and R300 000:   2015Mazda CX3 2.0 Individual 2015 Ford Ecosport 1.5 TDCI Titanium 2015 Honda HR-V 1.5 Comfort 2015 Opel Mokka 1.4T Cosmo 2015 Nissan Juke 1.5 DCi Acenta+   SUV under R325 000:   2015Mazda CX-5 2.0 Active 2015 Nissan Qashqai 1.2T Visia 2015 Toyota Fortuner 2.5D-4D 2015 Toyota RAV-4 2.0 GX 2015 Honda CRV 2.0 Comfort   Search for a second hand family car here.   The Destination   And finally, the destination. From Sea Point in the Cape to the borders between Namibia and Mozambique, when it comes to holiday getaways,South Africans are spoilt for choice.   While the warm Indian Ocean is a major draw card for holiday hunters seeking sun and sea, the Atlantic and the north of Cape Town hold its own special beauty.   From South West …   If you’re considering the Western Cape, explore outside the bounds of popular tourist destinations and visit the unspoilt beaches of Britannia Bay and surrounds such as Shelley Beach or Paternoster. This is a perfect retreat for those wanting peace from the madding crowds.   One of the most spectacular off-the-beaten-track locations in the Eastern Cape and possibly the country is the Baviaanskloof Mega Reserve - the third largest protected area in South Africa and a World Heritage site.   To North East …   Heading up north towards the border of Zimbabwe, lies another World Heritage site: the extraordinary Mapungubwe National Park and the Kingdom of Mapungubwe, once home to an advanced culture of people at that time period. Apart from it’s rich heritage and culture, why not visit there as an alternative to the Kruger National Park for game viewing and diversity of plant and wild life.   Which of these three elements are most important to you, the company, the vehicle, or the destination?   If you’re looking to buy a new second hand family car for your next trip or just everyday use, choose Auto Pedigree for quality, value,and choice from a wide variety of vehicles at dealers countrywide. Take advantage of our deal assistance promotion today.       Disclaimer: Auto Pedigree and the authors make no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or by following any link on this site. Auto Pedigree and the authors will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. Auto Pedigree and the authors will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.
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