Business woman sitting in front of car
What Today’s Women Want in a Car
Today, women play a dynamic role in society, taking on more tasks traditionally reserved for men, becoming increasingly financially independent, and holding far greater buying discretion than in the past. However, local and global research indicates that women tend to take a more traditional approach to buying cars than men, who often value performance above practicality and comfort.   The features most sought-after by South African women are matched to those most closely fitting the criteria.   Family Car   Women often own and drive the family car, where general features (comfort, convenience, fuel efficiency), as well as safety and reliability are prized. Related product and value perceptions are critical to women evaluating family car choices. The top three family car models in South Africa that most closely meet these criteria are:   Mazda CX.5 2.0 Peugeot 3008 2/0 HDI Allure Volkswagen Tiguan Allspace 1.4 Trendline Safety    Today, cars are launched with standard and optional safety features. According to the Women’s Choice Awards, the following safety features are highly ranked by women and would influence a woman’s vehicle purchasing decision: Adaptive headlights adjust a car’s headlights to curves in the road, making driving at night or under low-light conditions safer. Rear cross-traffic detection is a system designed to distinguish vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists or other hazards approaching from a vehicle’s left, right, or rear to help drivers avoid collisions. Forward collision warning systems use radar, laser, or cameras to detect an imminent crash thereby helping prevent or reduce the severity of an accident. A rear-view camera mounted on the rear of a car sends messages to the monitor positioned at the front of a car. These images are used by drivers to alleviate blind spots and to make reversing easier. According to iWyze Insurance, the following six car models are ranked tops in South Africa in terms of safety.   Volkswagen Polo Kia Rio Ford Fiesta Volvo XC90 Volkswagen Tiguan Mercedes Benz E Class Reliability   Women go out of their way to choose a reliable car to save themselves from trouble, expense, and safety dangers. Consumer reports, warrantees, and prices were the main variables considered in determining vehicle reliability in the Women’s Choice Awards. However, in South Africa, the following criteria are used to rank a car’s reliability:   Availability and affordability of spare parts Reliability of a vehicle after the motor plan has ended, with special focus on the number of major engine and gearbox problems a vehicle experiences over time Ability of dealerships to handle large repair jobs Affordability of repairs Affordability of insurance premiums, relative to vehicle price Business Technology news identifies the five most reliable South African vehicle brands as follows:   Toyota Honda Opel Nissan Mazda  General Features   Women’s Choice Awards ranked the following three general features most highly:   Comfort: Relative interior space for passengers, cargo, and seating capacity. Convenience and entertainment: Features such as climate control, cruise control, digital connectivity and hands-free car kits. Fuel economy: Both highway and city driving are included in this measurement. In the budget car segment, the following three models are ranked most highly:   CAR MODEL ENGINE SIZE FUEL CONSUMPTION Ford Fiesta 1.5 TDCI Trend 1.5 3.3 litres Fiat Tipo Sedan 1.3 Multijet Easy   1.3TD 3.7L Fiat 500 Twin Air Pop 0.9T 3.8L   Auto Pedigree has over 4,000 quality used cars ranging from sedans, SUVs, hatchbacks, and bakkies to service your individual requirements. Visit your nearest Auto Pedigree dealership for a test drive.   Disclaimer: This content is for informational purposes only. We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information.
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How Do I Finance a Vehicle?
Your vehicle is a tangible asset on your personal balance sheet. However, the way you handle your vehicle financing determines whether your car remains an asset. Once it becomes a liability you may struggle to pay it off and even cause you to become credit-bureau listed. Ensure your vehicle remains an asset by following these six steps: Doing background research into vehicles and financing Researching interest rates Saving for a deposit Structuring your repayments optimally Putting together appropriate personal documents Examining your vehicle finance contract Handling payment defaults   Doing Background Research into Vehicles and Financing Research thoroughly before putting in an offer on a vehicle or taking out vehicle finance. This puts you in charge of your personal finances, prevents embarrassment, and allows you to walk confidently into a dealership. Begin this journey by:   Identifying your transport needs. (Don’t be tempted to match your vehicle choice with the credit amount for which you qualify as this could stretch your finances unnecessarily and prevent you from saving). Checking your credit score for errors and disputing inaccurate information. Understand how negative information affects your ability to secure credit and the interest rates you will pay. You can check your credit score online at one of South Africa’s four credit bureaus, namely: TransUnion Compuscan Experian XDS Understanding your personal budget and financial situation. Remember that a longer term finance contract may mean smaller monthly repayments than a shorter-term finance contract but is more expensive as you pay more over time. Finding out the cost of insurance from your insurer so you can factor in that amount into your budget. Checking vehicle buying guides to identify the vehicle you wish to drive at a cost you can afford. Determining the market value of your current vehicle, which you may use as a trade-in to help finance your new car. Understanding the cost of credit including interest rates. Getting pre-approval from a bank before you walk into a dealership, so you can do so with confidence Understanding critical terms and conditions regarding vehicle loans, namely: -The minimum amount you may borrow is R40,000 -The minimum repayment period is 12 months. -The vehicle needs to be insured for the life time of the loan Researching Interest Rates Interest rates are the cost you pay to borrow money. It is calculated using a percentage to give you the actual amount to be paid. You may be able to negotiate a suitable rate between the various banks and finance houses.   Saving for a Deposit Start to save for a deposit as soon as you think about buying a car. With a bigger deposit, the risk to the bank will be less and you could qualify for a better interest rate. When assessing your profile, banks will view the fact that you have the ability to save and manage your finances as positive factors. A deposit lowers your monthly instalments as you will have less to repay, and you will be paying less interest. Structuring your Repayments Optimally   The longer you take to repay a loan, the more interest you’ll pay and banks often charge higher interest rates for longer loans, increasing your cost of credit.   By putting down a 10% deposit and financing your car over 54 months instead of 60, you make the following savings: Monthly repayment: R3,447 Total repaid over 54 months: R186,138 Total savings less the deposit: R11,712   Required Documents   Take the following documents with you when applying for vehicle finance, as they are required  to process your loan: Application form Identification document Proof of residence Income proof Three months bank statements Signature verification proof Passport size photograph of yourself Examine your Vehicle Finance Contract   Know the terms before signing any vehicle finance document whether at a dealership, bank, or other finance company as financing has a language of its own. Understand additional products a dealer may offer you, including: Deal assistance Fees – Pay for them in cash and don’t include as part of your vehicle finance agreement as this adds to costs Extended warrantees - Pay them upfront Credit Life Insurance – You have the option to offer (cede) your own Credit Life Policy to the bank covering the loan instead of the bank’s policy. The bank is allowed to check your policy and if it does not match its own, they can advise you to have it upgraded or to switch to their’s.     Terms and Conditions You are required to pay all fees and interest that appear on your loan contract. It’s best to pay the initiation fee in cash at the start of your loan as this saves interest over the life of your loan.   Handling Payment Defaults   If you do not pay your loan every month as agreed between you and the bank, this will add more interest and fees to your loan and the final payment of your loan will be later than you thought.   Should you get into financial difficulty, contact your bank immediately so they can draft a new payment plan and re-spread your arrears. This helps you maintain a positive credit rating and to steer clear of being negatively listed at a bureau.   Once you have researched and are ready to buy, Auto Pedigree has over 4,000 quality used cars for sale as well as finance arrangements with all major banks in South Africa to assist.
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wallet and car
What is Vehicle Finance?
With the average cost of a used car being in the region of R234,000 and over R300,000 for a new model, most South Africans may choose to finance their vehicle purchase. Because vehicle finance has far reaching implications on your budget, Auto Pedigree provides you with a roadmap on how to go about it sensibly.   Before you go ahead and apply for vehicle financing, take a holistic view of your purchase by considering the following:   Calculating monthly repayments Choosing a vehicle Making a deposit Understanding legal implications Deciding on vehicle finance repayments Taking out insurance Weighing up flexible financing options Calculating Monthly Repayments   Before even thinking about choosing a vehicle, look at online calculators supplied by South Africa’s leading banks or financiers to assess how much you can afford to repay monthly over your preferred repayment period.   Choosing a Vehicle   Have a clear idea of the type of motor vehicle you want and what you can afford to buy. Before applying for vehicle finance, understand:   Your vehicle requirements for work and leisure and whether you should buy a basic passenger vehicle, station wagon, bakkie, or some other type of utility vehicle. The vehicle features you want and can afford, such as air conditioning, power steering, and ABS brakes. Keep in mind when you apply for vehicle finance that you often get better value for your money by buying a used vehicle. Previously owned vehicles are cheaper because they have already depreciated in value. New vehicles have the advantage of coming with a manufacturers' warranty and may offer limited risk in terms of accident damage or mechanical breakdown and can have a longer life span. However, Auto Pedigree used vehicles are low mileage and are typically still under warranty. This means you buy a car that is almost new along with all the advantages of new, without the high price tag.   Making a Deposit   In terms of the National Credit Act, you do not need to pay a minimum cash deposit on any vehicle purchased. However it makes sense to save for a deposit, as your monthly repayments will be a lot less. Your deposit can either be in cash or as a vehicle trade-in. The size of your deposit and the length of the repayment period are at the discretion of the bank and are related to the risks involved. A general rule is that the older the vehicle the bigger the deposit and the shorter the repayment term.   Understanding Legal Implications   Minors (anyone below the age of 18) cannot legally enter into a contract to buy a motor vehicle or secure instalment credit for the purchase of a motor vehicle. Individuals 18 years and over may do so but should remember their responsibilities when signing a vehicle financing agreement, namely:   Paying the deposit and the remaining instalments Taking delivery of the vehicle on the agreed date Looking after the vehicle until the final instalment on your credit agreement has been paid Keeping the vehicle insured for the duration of the contract Making agreed vehicle repayments Contacting your bank should you find yourself in financial difficulty in order for them to draft a new payment plan and re-spread your arrears. Failing this, the bank (or finance company) has the right to: Sue you for the arrears Cancel the sale agreement Repossess the vehicle Claim damages from you   Deciding on Vehicle Finance Repayments   Most vehicle financing arrangements require monthly payments over a period of 6 to 60 months and you take ownership of your vehicle once you have made your final repayment. (Your finance house owns the vehicle before that date).   There are two ways of paying for the vehicle you have purchased, namely: Debit Order - Repayments are automatically deducted from your bank account and paid over to the vehicle financier every month. (Banks prefer debit orders as they are quick and easy to administer and ensure regular repayments). Manually (Cash or Electronic) – Repayments are madeby handing over or transferring the money electronically to the institution that has financed your vehicle every month.   Taking out Insurance   Any vehicle that is being financed through a bank must be comprehensively insured. Even one non-payment of a premium can result in a policy lapsing and a resulting financially precarious situation for the vehicle owner, especially in a collision.   Weighing Up Flexible Finance Options   It’s worth considering all financing options when considering vehicle finance. While some may save you money and give you flexibility others may be inappropriate given your financial situation. Here are four flexible financing solutions:   Balloon Repayments– These are optional loan repayments at the end of your loan term. This facility helps you extend your vehicle finance agreement by giving you more time to make repayments. For example, if you want to finance a car of R100,000 with a 10% balloon payment, you will pay off R90,000 over the agreed period and make a R10,000 payment at the end of the contract term. You will pay additional interest on this facility. Deal Assistance– Also known as Trade Assistance and is a benefit provided by Auto Pedigree giving you the flexibility to structure your vehicle finance using a lump sum to use as a: ·      Deposit ·      Deferred payment ·      Cash back ·      Combination of the above   Flexible Bond– Some people decide to keep all their debts under one roof and use their flexible home bond to repay their vehicle loan. However, it’s worth noting that a vehicle has a shorter life than a home. When you decide to finance your car using a flexible bond to finance your vehicle needs, you should repay the amount borrowed over a period roughly equivalent to that of the typical vehicle repayment period to prevent paying too much interest.   Payment Holiday– While the terms and conditions of this finance facility differ from bank to bank, you are sometimes allowed to structure your vehicle finance so you can take a break from your repayments one month a year or, by request, should you run into financial difficulties. If vehicle financing seems complicated and even daunting, Auto Pedigree consultants are available to assist you with any questions you may have. Find a dealer or call us on 010 593 9505.
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Dashboard lights
Will Your Car Pass the Inspection Test?
As with most complex machines, cars will invariably begin to succumb to wear and tear. Unchecked, this gradual abrasion will end up exposing your vehicle to the increased risk of performance failure on the road. South African legislation requires that a vehicle undergo a standard inspection test and be issued with a roadworthiness certificate for the sale of any motor vehicle to take place.   These inspection tests are administered by trained, registered technicians whose job it is to ensure, in the interest of everybody’s safety, that the car is safe and in an appropriate condition to take to the road. When selling and buying a car, a recognised, formal inspection test is necessary, but there are a few things you can check for yourself. This will give you a good impression on the overall state of the vehicle you’re buying. The Tyres Tyres are the first thing that inspectors look at. A quick once-over will give you a decent idea about the condition of these critical components. Tyres are the only point of contact between you and the road and should be checked regularly. Look for damage to the walls of the tyres, check that there is enough tread (grooves and edges in the rubber) remaining, and check the tyre pressure. Don’t forget the spare wheel, which is just as important to be in good condition and properly inflated. Your Windscreen Ensure that your windscreen is well-fitted and secure. The glass protects you from the wind, rain, and road debris. Debris especially can damage and obscure your windscreen. Check for small chips and have them repaired as soon as possible before they become cracks. Lights and Basic Electrics The electrical system of your car is complex and some elements need to be diagnosed digitally. You can perform a basic check by switching the car’s lights on, then checking each bulb – the headlights, brake lights, indicators, and fog lights. Ensure they illuminate fully without flickering or dimming when engaged. The Exterior Most buyers will not accept a car with a scratched or damaged exterior. Most scratches can be buffed out quite easily. Ask if any previous repair work has been done to the vehicle and inspect to make sure that the work is of a high standard. The Interior A clean, well-maintained interior should be free of any stains, grime, and suspicious smells! When your car goes for its roadworthiness inspection during the registration process, you can rest easy knowing that the Auto Pedigree 116-point check has covered all the bases.   What is included in a Vehicle Inspection?   There are a specified set of tests that your car must pass when registering the vehicle in your name. Inspectors will investigate a set of checks and tests before passing your car and declaring it safe and issuing the roadworthiness certificate. These important components are checked to be in working condition during a vehicle inspection: Brakes: Inspections will be conducted on the brakes’ individual components including the brake pads, disks, and lines. Your Lights: All bulbs on the lamps, indicators and brake lights. Indicators must work independently and correctly. Suspension: Apart from a detailed visual inspection of the shocks, the suspension must respond well to movement and the overall stability of the car. Wheels: The tyres’ pressure, tread, and integrity, as well as the rims must be in good shape and the spare wheel must also conform to the minimum test requirements. Chairs and Seatbelts: The seatbelts must have enough play to clip into the working seatbelt locking system. Seats must be secure and stable. Fuel System: The fuel system must deliver enough petrol to the engine, with no leakage, and at an efficient rate. Air intake and filters will also be examined. Engine: The engine and transmission must not stall, misfire, or overheat.   The Auto Pedigree 116-point check is developed to inspect as many components as possible in order to ensure every vehicle sold is as good as new.   How is the Auto Pedigree 116 test performed?   Auto Pedigree will ensure that the 116-point check is performed only by the most experienced, well-trained mechanics and engineers. This test demands that non-negotiable pass marks are achieved for the car to be listed to potential buyers. This way, when you buy a car from Auto Pedigree, you will know that it conforms only to the highest standards of quality. Transmission, Engine, Fuel Lines Part of the Auto Pedigree 116-point check involves testing three very important aspects – your transmission, the engine, and fuel lines. Together, these parts function as the power distribution system of your car. As these are often prone to wear and tear, they are investigated rigorously.   Transmission This refers to your gearbox. The gearbox adapts the power output of your engine to drive your wheels. In a car with manual transmission, these gears are shifted and engaged manually using your gearstick. Automatic transmissions do this for you as you drive. Eventually the gearbox will succumb to degradation through use and parts will need to be replaced.   Engine Our cars mostly use an internal combustion engine. This involves the mixing of fuel, air, and water, which is ignited. This all happens under high pressure and heat conditions. Each ignition creates energy that drives the pistons and sends energy to the wheels moving the car. Sounds simple? Not necessarily. Engines have many safety mechanisms, control valves and conduits and can be extremely complex. The heat and pressure can damage these components and expose the engine to failure over time. Each aspect is carefully checked, cleaned and corrected.   Fuel Lines The veins of your car, fuel lines carry petrol from the tank to the engine. Sometimes, these rubber veins can split, puncture, or break. This can leave highly flammable fuel leaking beneath and unpleasant fumes into your car. Often these leaks are tiny and do not pose a fiery risk, but it may lead to expensive fuel loss and allow air into the fuel system, choking up the engine. Easy to replace, fuel lines are inspected in detail to ensure you’re as safe as can be. Some of the other components that form part of the check include: Air conditioning Regulates the interior temperature and environment of the car. This system uses a lot of power to keep you comfortable. Clean-air filters are replaced, air-conditioning fluid topped off and all leaks repaired. Steering This critical function keeps you straight and safe on the road. From the wheels and the alignment to the steering column - all is calibrated to standard specifications. Lighting systems More than simply lighting the way, your lights perform the critical function of making you more visible, and telling other drivers what your intentions are (Like when stopping, turning, etc.) Faulty bulbs are replaced, fittings are cleaned, and all wire connections secured and insulated. Exterior All scratches, dents and marks are removed and repaired leaving the car looking in pristine condition. Exhaust system The “lungs” of your car, this important system runs the length of the vehicle from the engine to the rear. Exhaust systems, though sometimes prone to problems, are easy to repair. A healthy exhaust manifold will keep your ride purring along with minimal emissions – healthier for you and for the environment. Undercarriage Rocks, water, tar, and oil are just some of the elements that assault the undercarriage every time we drive, not to mention the grime that collects in the chassis below. It is cleaned, repaired and welded if necessary, ensuring the underneath of your car is solid and safe. Brake system This system is tested at length from having enough fluid in the lines, to replacing worn pads and discs. The brakes will also be properly calibrated to avoid over-sensitivity and to perform optimally. Tyres The tread depth and grip are determined to ensure they’re all up to specification. Any missing or damaged bolts and wheel nuts will be fitted in place, air valve caps replaced, and the wheels checked to ensure that they are correctly fitted and aligned. Clutch The clutch allows the gears to engage smoothly at different ratios. The clutch, cable, and gearbox are tested rigorously, so that the gears slip into place properly and the clutch allowed to operate. Shock Absorbers Attached to the wheel and vehicle axle, shock absorbers are tested to make travel more comfortable and to ensure the car is stable on the road. Engine As the heart and power source of your car, the engine is also the most complex part of the vehicle. Engineers will spend a good amount of time examining and conditioning this component to ensure it is running efficiently. Windshield The windscreen is one of the first things on the checklist. Often, chipped windscreens can be repaired, but if the damage is too great, will be replaced altogether. Vehicle Interior A full valet service is done with a thorough cleaning and disinfecting for a spotless, near-new interior. Safety Belts These lifesavers are thoroughly tested to ensure they comply only with the most stringent safety standards. The Auto Pedigree 116-point check ensures that your engine, transmission, and fuel lines are in perfect working order. Nothing is left to chance and the car is then put through a detailed calibration to make sure these components work together in sync, saving you money and keeping you safe.
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Dashboard lights
Dashboard Lights and what they Mean
What’s the first thing you see when you get into your car? The dashboard HUD (Head-up display) is a critical interface that provides us with important information, such as speed, revs per minute, engine temperature, and fuel levels. Newer models also tell us the outside temperature, which gear is engaged, and even the radio station you’re tuned into. But every so often, one of these little icons light up that we don’t easily recognise. These on-dash icons are almost always linked to your vehicle’s warning light information system. There are many and they can seem confusing at times, especially when you don’t know what they mean. Don’t worry though – your car won’t suddenly stop running when a light starts flashing en-route to work. Their purpose is to warn us, rather than to cause panic and alarm.   Let us take a look at some of these more common indicators and what they mean:   Engine Light Quite possibly the most important, this light tells us that your car’s computer has run a diagnostic and found some trouble. Take your car to a service professional to have it checked.   Oil Pressure Warning This important indicator means that you’re out of oil or have lost oil pressure. Head to the nearest petrol station for an oil top-up. If it persists, check for leaks under your car, which indicates a serious problem and needs to be booked in for a repair.   Engine Temperature Warning This light means that your car is getting a little too warm. Try taking it easy on the accelerator, stop riding the clutch, check your water levels, or make sure you have enough coolant in your car. This could also mean things are chilly under the bonnet. Tip: In winter, drive off slower in the morning for a few minutes before to let the engine warm-up properly.    Brake System Warning You either still have the handbrake engaged or your brake fluid is running low. You may also have an ABS problem. Release the handbrake fully, top up your brake fluid or, if the problem still shows, head over to a service professional.   Battery Warning Light This means that the power voltage level of your car battery is not where it should be. Take a peek at the power terminal, check that it’s clean and all connections are secure and well fitted. If the light remains, visit a battery specialist to have the unit tested.   There is a myriad of other warning indicators on your dash HUD, some indicating minor problems such as an empty windscreen washer fluid reservoir and others, indicating more serious issues that need to be investigated immediately. Always take action when you see these dashboard light indicators. They’re your little helpers – a way for your car to tell you that it needs a little TLC. When you buy a car from Auto Pedigree, your car sets off on the right foot with a 116-point check. From the instruments and lighting to engine transmission and braking, your vehicle is inspected to ensure complete driving peace of mind.
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Automatic Numberplate Recognition Industry Workshop held in Johannesburg
Automatic Number Plate Recognition Industry Workshop
Fouché Burgers and Roelof Viljoen, Business Against Crime South Africa Mobility is the key to success – it is even the synonym of progress. While we can (still) not transport goods and people through the Internet, we need to move it using some sort of vehicle. In South Africa, all organisations deal with long distances and a lack of punctual, effective, safe public transport. It follows that a fully operational and capable road vehicle is an extremely valuable asset to anyone. This is true for legitimate business as well as criminal networks. Criminals will go to great lengths to make their operations blend into legitimate traffic. Vehicles are both instruments in crime (providing mobility) and targets of crime (generating income by selling stolen goods). Imagine any high-risk crime committed with a bicycle and a cash robbery with a horse and cart as a getaway vehicle. Maybe in the 1800s – Wild West cowboys attacking a train carrying gold bullion – but in 300 years, all types of business moved on. In South Africa, the value of road vehicles stolen and hijacked per year adds up to R13 billion. More than 20 000 vehicles in this group (valued at R4 billion) re-enters the market illegally as a clone of a legitimate vehicle while others (valued at R1.4 billion) are taken apart for parts. Some of these legitimised vehicles are retained to commit crime, but most of them are again sold on, eventually into the hands of consumers.   The Emergence of Number Plates Very early in the road vehicle history, authorities realised that vehicles are too similar and have to be allocated a means of identification from a distance. Number plates emerged in France in 1893, Germany in 1896 and the Netherlands in 1898. Thus, when road vehicles started becoming commonplace in Johannesburg in the first decade of 1900, number plates were an established feature. With the official population of registered motor vehicles in South Africa first surpassing 12,5 million in January 2019, it is evident that automated identification is necessary to enable the legitimate economy to fight back against the erosion of economic growth by motor vehicle-related crime. Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) is a technology embraced by law enforcement as a new enabler to address vehicle-related crime. It is claimed to have been invented in 1976 at the Police Scientific Development Branch in the United Kingdom. Several terms are used for the same technology such as Licence Plate Recognition (LPR), Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI), etc., born by the informal industry from the need for a marketable brand. Law Enforcement in the form of the Johannesburg Metro Police Department first implemented ANPR on a large scale in South Africa. In 2006 the cost of a camera and system was prohibitive. Modes of deployment included stationary cameras for speed law enforcement, vehicle mounts to increase the footprint and intelligent roadblocks. As the technology was facilitated by the rapid growth in closed-circuit television (security cameras), the barrier to entry into the market was lowered and the private sector started deploying the technology to protect its own operations against vehicle-based crime. Several business types emerged along the supply chain to identify, record and react to vehicle position information. These systems collect a wealth of information that can be used by law enforcement agencies (e.g. police) and the private sector to fight crime effectively.   Commitment to Fighting Crime On 20 February 2019, the SAPS held a workshop with government departments and agencies responsible for the enforcement of vehicle control and vehicle-related information. All these agencies committed to collaboration in the initiatives to fight vehicle-related crime and specifically the collaboration with the private sector. Most of the cameras in South Africa are owned by the private sector or community initiatives, which makes it different from other countries where the infrastructure was implemented by government. This creates a unique environment for a public-private partnership in the ANPR industry. BACSA has positioned itself to, in collaboration with Business Leadership SA, enhance its role to facilitate partnerships and collaboration with the private industry role players and Government such as the SAPS. One of the areas of focus is to clarify and support issues regarding ethics and standards in the use of technology.   Workshopping a Way Forward On 13 March 2019, Business Against Crime South Africa (BACSA) successfully facilitated the first industry workshop on Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) in Johannesburg. Forty-six (46) nominated representatives from twenty-nine (29) private and public organisations including the SAPS, system users, technical developers, service providers and industry associations participated. The aim of the workshop was to determine the way forward to ultimately make South Africa a safer place through a structured collaboration of the industry role players and to determine the feasibility of creating a cost-effective and non-commercial solution to leverage the wealth of available information.   The workshop noted that the quality control of number plates seriously affects the usefulness of ANPR technologies. It is further noted that the principles and technical detail for the envisioned information interchange shall be documented and agreed to by all parties. All the participants indicated their support for the initiative, led and facilitated by BACSA in partnership with the SAPS. Although a lot of work still needs to be done, BACSA has reviewed its memorandum of understanding with the SAPS, which includes the ANPR project and is of the opinion that this structured collaboration between businesses and government is an initiative that will assist in making a sizable difference in the fight against crime.   For more information or to take part in this initiative, please see www.bac.org.zaor send an email to info@bac.org.za.   
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 Example of how the deal assistance deferred payment option works
What is a Deferred Payment Option?
Auto Pedigree’s Deal Assistance offer allows you as a car buyer to structure your own deal in terms of payment options. The deferred payment option allows you to start paying your finance instalments at a later date. The deal assistance amount can be used to pay for your initial instalments to the finance bank upfront, anything from 1 – 8 months; the exact amount of time depends on the amount available on your specific transaction and deal structure. The Advantage of Deferred Payments Delaying your instalments to pay a few months later means you can take a ‘payment holiday’. Use your deal assistance amount towards initial monthly instalments The first few instalments are paid for and in effect not due immediately out of your pocket  Deferred payment terms can vary, make sure you understand the details and your particular situation. But there’s no doubt that being free of instalments to pay for the first few months of buying your vehicle is of great benefit to you. How does the Deferred Payment Option Work? In order to determine when your first debit order will commence, divide the deal assistance amount offered (e.g. R50,000) by the instalment amount (e.g. R7,142).    One Lump Sum Payment  The full deal assistance amount offered can also be used as an initial lump sum payment in the first month. Other Deal Assistance Options  There are three other options, and deal assistance is even flexible enough to allow you to choose any combination. Therefore, you can combine your deferred payment option with any of the following: Deposit – used towards the upfront payment of the vehicle Trade-in – Add the amount to your vehicle purchase Cash back - Use the amount for your personal needs Vehicle deal assistance provides a way to structure vehicle payments by selecting what options suits you, your lifestyle, and your pocket best. Let Auto Pedigree help you find your new used car because you deserve a great deal.    
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Auto Pedigree deal assistance used as cash back example
What is the ‘Cash Back’ Option in Vehicle Deal Assistance?
Auto Pedigree’s Deal assistance offer allows you as a car buyer to structure your own deal in terms of payment options. One of these options includes what is referred to as ‘cash back’.   The cash back option allows you as a car buyer the flexibility to use the amount in other ways. Good ways to put this option to use could go towards a student loan or school fees, settling your high interest personal loans, and generally paying off outstanding debts. This means you are not obligated to use the money towards the purchase of a vehicle. You’re also able to buy a better quality vehicle because you’ve alleviated your other expenses.   Auto Pedigree gives you the choice to use the amount in any way you want.   How does the Cash Back Option Work? Example of how the deal assistance cash back option works   On the successful purchase of a vehicle and payment from the bank, Auto Pedigree will process the cash back amount into your bank account via EFT or with a cheque. If you need cash on hand then this deal assistance option is for you. Other Deal Assistance Options There are at least three other options, and deal assistance is even flexible enough to allow you to choose any combination. Therefore, you can combine your cash back option with any of the following:   Deposit – used towards the upfront payment of the vehicle Trade-in – Add the amount to your vehicle purchase Deferred payment – Use the amount to pay for the initial instalment/s  Vehicle deal assistance provides a way to structure vehicle payments by selecting which options suits you, your lifestyle, and your pocket best. Let Auto Pedigree help you find your new used car, because you deserve a great deal.   https://www.fin24.com/Money/Vehicle-Finance/a-few-common-misconceptions-when-buying-a-car-20160329 https://www.sapling.com/4869424/what-different-types-budgeting https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://auto.howstuffworks.com/under-the-hood/cost-of-car-ownership/car-rebates-incentives1.htm https://federalautoloan.com/blog/how-do-cash-back-deals-work/ https://www.carsdirect.com/auto-loans/how-to-buy-a-car-with-cash-back https://www.carsdirect.com/car-buying/understanding-car-dealer-rebates-and-incentives    
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